Tag Archives: Georgia

University of Washington | Remembering our Roots

As we gear up for the big football game (the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl College Football Playoff Semifinal) between our alma mater UW (The University of Washington) and BAMA (Alabama), my husband reminded me of how we stopped in for a short visit to the U.W. campus last summer (2015) to show the kids what used to be our old stomping grounds for several years as we got our college degrees.

We arrived on a three-day holiday week-end and made a quick stop at the columns and borrowed the bus lane for a few quick moments— the campus police were nice to us that day as no Joe Metro (city bus) was running through there at that time.  We wanted to dash across the street to show the kids the beautiful columns that once stood at the original University of Washington campus.  Visiting on the holiday was a good thing in that it made it less congested to drive through the campus with our travel trailer. It also made it easy to park on campus as we took up several spaces. (We really don’t recommend coming thru campus with a big RV set up unless it’s on a holiday or day where classes are not in session.) I remember us drawing a lot of attention from the students who were on campus that day and thinking to myself, who would have thought all those years ago that we’d be driving thru campus with an RV loaded with kayaks and five kids on our way from Georgia!?! Crazy!

no-parking quick stop

University of Washington Columns

I had the original U.W. four pillars (shown above) on my graduation announcement. Funny how now, these four sons of ours represent what’s really important to me… they are the true pillars for the future…our best work.

The University of Washington has a gorgeous campus and it was fun to explore the places we once roamed. It was a bit surreal to take our children to places that existed in our lives before they were born, but I’m glad we did it. (Will have to take them again as the amazing Suzzallo Library’s Graduate Reading Room  — one of the top 10 most beautiful libraries architecturally in the US — was closed the day we visited.)

It reminded me that it’s good to have roots. I know a lot of readers following us on this blog are drawn to the idea of freedom traveling and the open road — don’t get me wrong, there is a a lot of good that comes from traveling, but I’ve also found that roots are just as important. When we came home after being gone for 101 days, it felt WONDERFUL to have a home to come back to and rest. It felt WONDERFUL to have people say, “We missed you” and for that feeling to echo resonating in our own hearts. Yes, it’s great to explore and travel, but I have found that the people and friendships we have at home are the ones that carry us along as we go. Share your roots with your children and also be sure to give them roots for their future as well.  I am thankful for those loved ones in both Seattle and Atlanta… we are doubly-blessed to have two places we can feel at home. Where do you call home?

University of Washington

Atlanta, GA | Atlanta Botanical Gardens

The kids ready to enter the Atlanta Botanical Garden

    The kids ready to enter the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Those of you who know me, know that I like to grow things. I am wired to nurture whether it be children, critters, or plants. So, the Atlanta Botanical Garden has been on my wish list for a long time as a place to explore and we had the opportunity to do just that this last week! The main attraction was the Chihuly Exhibit which is placed throughout the entire garden to delight and give you the opportunity to explore the many types of gardens.  Here are a few of the highlights we saw along the way. Mind you, photos are great, but to experience these for yourself — you must see these glass and neon sculptures in person to fully appreciate them. They are amazing! #atlantabg #myfavchihuly

Chili Glass Sculptures at The Atlanta Botanical Garden
Chihuly Indigo Blue Icicle Tower, installed in 2015
LJ at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens
Our 6-year-old had to try out the cool outdoor seating along the Kendeda Canopy Walk.

As we entered the garden, we chose to go to the right and walk the Kendeda Canopy Walk to see four Chilhulys and the Cascades Garden where the giant topiary — the “Earth Goddess” — resides with a beautiful reflection pool full of brightly colored Chihuly glass. Nearly all areas are handicap accessible with nice wide paths to enjoy. If you’re limited on time and only have an hour to explore, you might want to check out some of their recommended “Power Hour” tours.

Earth Goddess at The Atlanta Botanical Gardens

The background on how the Earth Goddess was built and constructed to be a living topiary.
The background on how the Earth Goddess was built and constructed to be a living topiary.
The Earth Goddess at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens with Chihuly Glass Sculptures
The Earth Goddess at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens with Chihuly Glass Sculptures

Don’t forget to stop and smell the flowers along the way! 🙂 I loved seeing a beautiful bearded iris growing along the path — my Grandmother used to grow these along her house every year.

Viviette Smelling Flowers
Stop and smell the flowers!
Bearded Iris
My Grandmother used to grow the most beautiful bearded irises.

The Atlanta Botanical Gardens make a great stop to stretch your legs if you’re visiting Atlanta. It took us about two hours to walk through the gardens at a leisurely rate, but I left feeling like I could have seen even more. We didn’t make it to the Children’s garden the day we visited, so we will have to go back and share that as well.

Kids walking and looking at gardens
The Atlanta Botanical Garden is a great place to stretch your legs and enjoy the sights while you take a walk.
Erin Castillo 2016 5kidsandarv.com
Blue and White in the Levi Parterre, a permanent Chihuly piece in the Atlanta Botanical Garden

For a moment I felt like a princess walking in her palace grounds with the groomed hedges in the Levi Parterre garden. Had it not been sweltering hot in the middle of July, I would have loved to sit on one of those benches for a bit. Definitely best to visit early in the day throughout summer months and prime weather conditions in Atlanta will be in the months of April/May and October/November.

Get great inspiration from the many beautiful planters at the Atlanta Botanical Garden
Get great inspiration from the many beautiful planters at the Atlanta Botanical Garden
Orange Glass Chihuly Fountain Sculpture by Gift Shop
Three Graces Tower  (2016)

I’ve been working on my own garden this year, so it was a real treat to see how professionals approached an edible garden. The vertical garden was a beautiful assortment of textures! I would have loved to see some aquaponics as an addition to how they were growing food.

Edible Garden

Edible Garden and perennial wall.
Edible Garden and perennial wall.
Garden Walkway
Walkway to the Edible Garden area.

Also on my wish list is to return in the evening with my husband to view the Chihuly Nights where the garden glass sculptures are lit up with neon. There’s a restaurant on location making it a perfect date night destination! (Garden admission is required to access the restaurant.)

Column of Fire Chihuly Saffron Tower
Chihuly “Saffron Tower” (2008) with water mirror reflection pool in the Glade Garden. Remember, they ask that you not throw coins into the water features.
Tiger-Lilies-LR
Tiger Lilies infront of the Zebra Reeds (2015)

The Fuqua Orchid Center was mostly closed off except for one small section, but that section was full of gorgeous and rare orchids to enjoy. It was like stepping into a slice of paradise! Own an orchid? Check out the Atlanta Botanical Garden’s blog.

Chihuly Black and Green Stripe Herons with Icicle Clusters (2015) in the Fuqua Orchid Center
Chihuly Black and Green Stripe Herons with Icicle Clusters (2015) in the Fuqua Orchid Center

Orchid-Closeup-1-LR

Orchid-Closeup-2-LR

Orchid-Closeup-3-LR

Stepping into the Fuqua Orchid Garden is like stepping into a tropical paradise!
Stepping into the Fuqua Orchid Garden is like stepping into a tropical paradise!

We ended up purchasing a membership since it was the best value ($109 for 2 adults and up to 8 children + you get 4 visitor passes to use throughout the year).  Don’t forget that your membership card also gets you a discount in the Gift Shop! Chihuly in the Garden and Chihuly Nights will only run from April – October of 2016, so be sure to stop in if you are traveling to Atlanta during those months!

Atlanta Location:

ADMISSION:

Adult $21.95
Child ages 3 to 12 $15.95
Child under 3 Free
Garden member Free

Weather Policy: The Garden is open rain or shine. Most gardens are located outside so dress appropriately for weather. There are indoor air conditioned and heated areas for visitors including the visitor center, café and conservatory and orchid center. Refunds or rain checks on admission ticket purchases are not granted for weather related reasons.

PARKING: On-site parking is available in the SAGE Parking Facility:

Time Period Cost
Drop-off period (0 – 30 minutes) Free
31 – 60 minutes $2.00
Each additional 30 minutes $1.00
Maximum daily rate $15.00

DIRECTIONS:
The Atlanta Botanical Garden is located adjacent to Piedmont Park at 1345 Piedmont Avenue, Atlanta, GA, 30309.

View Google Maps

REGULAR HOURS (as of July 9, 2016)

April – October
Tuesday, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wednesday – Sunday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
The Garden is open from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. on Monday, July 4 for Independence Day.

Chihuly Nights Hours
Wednesday – Sunday, 6 – 10 p.m.

November – March
Tuesday – Sunday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Please note: The Children’s Garden is closed for renovations until summer of 2016. The Garden is undergoing capital improvements including renovated gardens and new amenities. Closed Mondays and in the daytime on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

REFRESHMENTS
In Atlanta, enjoy a Garden inspired menu from the team of Chef Linton Hopkins, a James Beard Award winner and popular local restauranteur, at the new Linton’s restaurant. Light snacks and refreshments are also available seasonally. Outside food and beverage are not permitted. During daytime hours, Garden admission is required for Non-Members. During Chihuly Nights, Garden admission is required for both Members and Non-Members.

Linton’s Information

For visitor info, go to the Atlanta Botanical Garden’s Web site at http://atlantabg.org/visit/visitor-info

Be sure to observe this garden etiquette when visiting… http://atlantabg.org/content/1-visit/2-visitor-info/garden-etiquette.pdf

pinterest-page-teaser-chihuly-atlantabg


Was this information helpful to you? If so, please click the links below to share on Facebook or pin to Pinterest so that others may enjoy this experience as well. Thanks for spreading the word!

5 Kids and a RV recommendations are based on personal experience and do not represent the business or not-for-profit we feature. We share our experiences in an effort to inspire parents and caregivers to engage and explore with their children. On occasion we may post a review or provide information as an affiliate.

5 Kids and a RV: “Let’s go learn something today!

Chickamauga Battlefield & the Chattanooga National Military Park

 

Facebook-Post-Chickamauga

I will never forget the first time I visited a historic battlefield from the Civil War in Atlanta and walked the rows and rows of headstones of soldiers that had fallen in battle. There was awe as I read stories about grandfathers, fathers, and sons all going out to fight and falling to their deaths as Sherman marched to Savannah. It was the first time I realized that what I had read about in my school books, actually happened and those families still remembered and felt that loss. It really happened. And there was a great cost to both sides who fought over this freedom.

Being history lovers, we always look forward to the opportunity to explore and learn something new — especially in our home state. So when we went to Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, the nations oldest and largest battlefield, we were amazed at how much land this battle encompassed. We started out at the Visitor’s Center at Chickamauga (which I recommend you do the same). If you’re in a RV, note that they have RV parking to the left of the Visitor Center (just follow the signs) which is great!

Chickamauga

Chickamauga Battlefield - 5kidsandarv

We were surprised to see the largest collection of antique rifles we had ever seen. The boys were in rifle heaven.  They even got to see a blunderbuss — a rifle that they had seen on the TV show, Pawn Stars — and stood within inches of one (see pic below).  The Fuller Gun Collection of American Shoulder Arms collection spans about six rows if memory serves me correctly; certainly an impressive collection. There was even a rifle that had a built-in coffee grinder in the stock!

chickamauga_vc_lobby

Rows and rows of antique rifles - 5kidsandarv

chickamauga_rowsofguns

chickamauga_joshblunderbust

Peyton pointing at a rifle he likes

Wax soldier charging - Chickamauga Battlefield

Chickamauga Battlefield - Wax Soldier

They had some wax soldiers to help illustrate how the soldiers fought and even a real Battery Wagon. I especially love how they preserved the cannon balls that were lodged into the trees. I’ve seen this at Kennesaw Mountain National Park’s Civil War Museum as well and it just shows the reality of what was flying thru the air and the force that these pieces of artillery had to destroy whatever was in it’s path.  They also offer a short film, but we had arrived towards the end of the day after the last film had already started to show.

Canon balls embedded into trees

Battery Wagon from the Civil War - Chickamauga

Chickamauga Battlefield - Battery Wagon History

Model of a Battery Wagon and how it would have been pulled. Chickamauga Battlefield

There is also a selection of cannons in front of the Visitor Center, showing the variety of military arsenal used at the time. After we finished at the Visitor Center, we loaded the kids up and drove thru the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park where the battle took place. What impressed me was that there were a multitude of memorials erected in the memory of those that had fought. (Most of the 1,400 monuments and historical markers on the battlefields were planned and placed by Boynton and other veterans of the battles.) We would be driving along and a sign would simply state, this is where General so-and-so fell and died. Very sombering to know that a life — someone’s son, brother, husband, or father — ended there. We stopped by the Wilder Brigade Monument — a tower constructed around 1899 to aid in viewing the national park — and Jes and the older boys climbed the stairs to the top while I stayed in the car with the sleeping littles.

Did you know? The four Union generals given credit for bringing an end to the Civil War (Generals Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, George H. Thomas, and Philip Sheridan) were all in Chattanooga in the autumn of 1863.

Chickamauga Battlefield Tower

Chickamauga Battlefield Tower Top

Did you know? Arthur MacArthur, Jr. was awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863. His son, Douglas MacArthur, was awarded the Medal of Honor during World War II.

Cannons on display at Chickamauga Battlefield

Chickamauga Casualties

Did you catch that? About 37,000 men that were killed, wounded or missing! A battle that included 124,000 men! That’s a huge confrontation!

So, when I saw the little cabin (see pic below) used as the outpost for treating the wounded on either side, I couldn’t help but to think of the numbers of men lying in this very grassy knoll, probably lined up in row after row, hoping to live and survive the excruciating pain as they faced an amputation to survive… Be sure to read the following taken from the reader-board shown next to the boys. (Still can’t believe this home housed a family of NINE!)

Snodgrass Cabin - Chickamauga Battlefield

Snodgrass Cabin

We only spent a few hours at Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park as we were headed towards Chattanooga to camp, fish and explore, but we saw a lot, learned more about the Civil War, and it didn’t cost us anything but our fuel. (Awesome!) Hope you check this out if you’re in the area! It’s worth the visit and if you end up visiting, be sure to leave a comment of how it was in the comments below!

Details-Costs

WHAT KIDS CAN LEARN THRU THIS EXPERIENCE:

  • Civil War History
  • Battery Wagons
  • Cannons
  • Visual progression of how guns and rifles developed over time

You’ll walk where Confederate and Union soldiers fought in the bloodiest two-day battle of the war on September 19-20, 1863. The Visitor’s Center offers exhibits, bookstore, Fuller Gun Collection of American Shoulder Arms and 23-minute film.

Cost to go thru the Visitor Center:
Adults – Free
Seniors (65 and over) – Free
Active Military Personnel – Free (with ID)
Students – Free
Children 12 and under – Free*
*Be sure to ask for a Junior Ranger Packet which is free and a great teaching tool.

Point Park on top of Lookout Mountain is the only Designated Fee Area located within Chickamauga and Chattanooga NMP. The fee is $5.00 per adult (age 16 or older). Children 15 years or younger are free.


TIPGet a national parks pass and gain free admission into any National Park in the country.


Hours:
Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center is open daily from 8:30 am to 5 pm Eastern Click here for more details.
*Visitor Centers are closed New Year’s Day and Christmas.

Tours:
The historic Cravens House on Lookout Mountain is open for tours Saturday and Sunday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the summer. Cravens House closes at 5 p.m. Contact Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at 423-821-7786 for additional information. For additional tours offered click here.

Pets are more than welcome in the park. However, please remember to keep them leashed at all times.

Be sure to check the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Web site for possible re-enactments around the time of the battle’s anniversary (September 19-20)

See Map Graphic
Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
3370 Lafayette Rd
Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742
(706) 866-9241

Also nearby is the 6th Calvery Museum, Lee and Gordon’s Mill, and Lookout Mountain, tour Ruby Falls and ride the world’s steepest passenger railway at Incline Railway.

Map of Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park 

Click Map to Enlarge


Was this information helpful to you? If so, please click the links below to share on Facebook or pin to Pinterest so that others may enjoy this experience as well. Thanks for spreading the word!

 

5kidsandarv-approved5 Kids and a RV recommendations are based on personal experience and do not represent the business, agency, or not-for-profit we feature. We share our experiences in an effort to inspire parents to engage and explore with their children. As always, whenever trying something new, please use your own good judgement in what best suits the needs of your family to keep everyone safe while having fun.

5 Kids and a RV: “Let’s go learn something today.”
Copyright 2016

Cartersville GA | Etowah Indian Mounds – Part 2

FB-Cartersville-Etowah-Indian-Mounds

If you’re traveling out west of Atlanta, don’t miss this great learning opportunity for your kiddos! This location is close to Red Top Mountain RV campsites within a 10-minute drive (6 miles) and Lake Allatoona campgrounds. You can make a day of it and cover the Booth Museum and the Etowah Indian Mounds. This is part two in a series…

The Etowah Indian Mounds:

IMG_5775R_LR

The Etowah Mounds provide a great way to enjoy the outdoors with your family!  Plus, it’s only a 10-minute drive from the Booth Western Art Museum so you can do both if you are able to be on your feet for most the day.

IMG_5722R_LR

They have a small museum space (very small actually) which only takes about 15-20 minutes tops to walk thru. It’s really geared toward older kids on up to adults. If you have littles, you’ll probably cruise thru this section.  There is supposed a film you can watch, but when we checked in, the man at the front desk didn’t mention it and there was a school group in that area so that might be why he didn’t say anything about it. Either way, we missed out on the film, so if you view the film, feel free to comment below and fill us all in on how it went. To prepare for more discussion, I recommend reading up on it a bit before hand:

This region was home to an estimated several thousand Native Americans from 1000 A.D. to 1550 A.D., this 54-acre site protects six earthen mounds, a plaza, village site, borrow pits and defensive ditch. Etowah Mounds is the most intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeast.

We went in the first part of April when the trees were starting to awaken and some even in full bloom. It’s best to climb the Etowah mounds when temps are moderate (60-78 degrees) as you will certainly break a sweat climbing the steps! I would not visit the months of June-September due to dangers of heat exhaustion unless you’re going early in the morning — especially with littles. I would not attempt this as a field trip in the summer personally. My kiddos tuckered out and water is a must. But the view is so worth it!

IMG_5735L_LR
The climb to the top of Mound 1 • Copyright 2015 Erin Castillo
IMG_5743R_LR
At the top of Mound 1. There are no guard rails at the summit of the mound, so keep an eye on energetic little ones! • Copyright 2015 Erin Castillo

Caution! The hills are steeper than you think! There are no safety rails, so good common sense is necessary to keep littles from tumbling down a very steep mound. This photo was taken at the top of the largest mound.


They also have a re-constructed Wattle & Daub House that you can view up close. You can see how it was constructed here. We visited before the sides were put up I think because this is how it looked when we were there… (did the Etowah’s have chicken wire back then?) ;D

IMG_5728R_LR

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Details-Costs

WHAT KIDS CAN LEARN THRU THIS EXPERIENCE:

  • Native American History (specifically Mississippian Culture)  thru experience and museum artifacts

It took us about an hour-and-a-half to go thru both the museum and walk out to the mounds. We only climbed the large mound because we had a 1 year old on my back and a rambunctious 4-year-old explorer, so if you want to climb the other two mounds, budget additional time. Here are the details for planning your budget and outing…

Cost:
– Adults $6.00
– Seniors (62+) $5.00
– Youth (6-17) $4.00
– Youth Groups (6-17) $3.50
– Child (under 6) $2.00
Group rates available with advance notice.
Bus parking available.
*Children must be accompanied by parent or guardian. Be sure to check their website before you visit to see if there are any other restrictions as things change from the time of this posting. 


TIP: Don’t forget your water bottles and a snack! Though the mounds look small from the road, they are a good climb to the top! And bring a little bit of spending money as they also have a small gift shop where the kids can leave with a special item to remember their outing by.


Hours:
Tuesday–Saturday / 9AM–5PM
*Closed Mondays, Sundays, New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. For a more enjoyable visit, plan to spend 1–2 hours.

Events:
The Georgia State Parks hosts various events throughout the year at the Etowah Mounds. You may want to check their website for upcoming events in coordinating your travel plans.

See Map Graphic
Etowah Indian Mounds
813 Indian Mound Rd SE,
Cartersville, GA 30120
770-387-1300
  • Cartersville GA | Cowboys, Indians & Western Art Part 1
  • Cartersville GA | Tellus Science Museum Part 3  [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | Cauble Park Part 4 [coming soon]
  • Kennesaw, GA | KSU Museum of History and Holocaust Education Part 5 [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | Pickett’s Mill Battlefield and Homestead Part 6 [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | RV Campsite – Red Top Mountain [coming soon]
  • See other trips you can take like this one. Search by State

area-things-to-do-cartersville Click Map to Enlarge


Was this information helpful to you? If so, please click the links below to share on Facebook or pin to Pinterest so that others may enjoy this experience as well. Thanks for spreading the word!

5 Kids and a RV recommendations are based on personal experience and do not represent the business or not-for-profit we feature. We share our experiences in an effort to inspire parents and caregivers to engage and explore with their children.

5 Kids and a RV: “Let’s go learn something today!

Cartersville GA | Cowboys, Indians & Western Art – Part 1

FB-Booth-Museum

If you’re traveling out west of Atlanta, don’t miss this great learning opportunity for your kiddos! This location is close to Red Top Mountain RV campsites within a 10-minute drive (6 miles) and Lake Allatoona campgrounds. You can make a day of it and cover the Booth Museum and the Etowah Indian Mounds.

The Booth Museum:

Using the saddlebagIMG_5876

When I first heard that Cartersville, Georgia had a Western Art Museum, admittedly I sort of scoffed at the thought that cowboys and Native Americans could have artistic value. In my head, I had the stereotypical image of John Wayne or the Lone Ranger with his side-kick, Tonto and thought the entire museum would be the two sides at odds with each other. I also thought it would be a small collection. Boy, was I wrong on all accounts!

The Booth Museum is the only museum of its kind in the Southeast and is the second largest art museum in the state of Georgia (The HIGH in Atlanta is reportedly the largest).  The Booth also houses the largest permanent exhibition space for Western American art in the country! The exhibits cover two levels and there are so many pieces of artwork, sculptures and artifacts that relate to Native Americans and America Cowboys that I lost count along the way. It also covers the Civil War era and has a Presidents exhibit as well as a children’s activity area on the lower level. There are eight galleries that are continually on display.

Paper Sculpture at the Booth Western Art Museum

IMG_5825

We like to visit on the first Thursday of each month because we can all get in free (now that I have twins that are teens that helps me a lot on the pocket book.)  It typically takes us 2-3 hours to go thru the exhibits and the kids love finishing downstairs on the lower level at Sagebrush Ranch where they have interactive activities that include riding in a pretend stagecoach, saddling up on a pretend horse, playing dress up, or doing one of several learning games or puzzles.

Elevator run by weight system

And while you are there, you can share with your kids a quick physics lesson on how pulleys work to help lift heavy objects because The Booth has a beautiful glass elevator (pictured above) with real weights that lift and lower the elevator with ease and ever so quiet – one of only two of it’s kind in the country!


TIP:  When you check in at the information desk, be sure to ask about getting a Saddlebag (shown above in pic) for your kiddos during your visit to the Museum. The Saddlebag is filled with learning-related activities to be done throughout the Museum to help get your child actively engaged with the art. When selecting a Saddlebag, children have the option of three themes: “Cowboy”, “Native American”, or “Presidents”. Saddlebags are FREE and can be checked out from the information desk on the main floor of the Museum.


This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Details-Costs

WHAT KIDS CAN LEARN THRU THIS EXPERIENCE:

  • Native American History thru art and artifacts
  • American History thru art and artifacts
  • Civil War depicted thru art (special collections)
  • Western Expansion of Territories (2 real stage coaches!)
  • Medals of Valor (in Presidents gallery)
  • Presidents of the United States (read actual letters)
  • Pop Culture Western Art
  • Physics: Unique Elevator

We typically visit the Booth about 2-3 times a year to take advantage of new rotating exhibits and to dive deeper into our understanding. Every time we visit we all learn something new. I hope you take advantage of this great opportunity. Here are the details for planning your budget and outing…

Cost:
Adults – $10
Seniors (65 and over) – $8
Active Military Personnel – Free (with ID)
Students – $7
Children 12 and under – Free*
*Children must be accompanied by parent or guardian. Be sure to check their website before you visit to see if there are any other restrictions as things change from the time of this posting. Membership is available for free admittance.


TIP: The first Thursday of every month has free admission between the hours of 4-8 pm for all ages. In addition, another free admission opportunity is available to Century Bank of Georgia members who can receive free admission to Booth Western Art Museum on the second Saturday and Sunday of each month.


Hours:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday – 10:00 am to 5:00 pm
Thursday – 10:00 am to 8:00 pm
Sunday – 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
*Closed Mondays, New Year’s Day, July 4th, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Tours:
A guided Highlights Tour is given everyday (Tuesday – Sunday) at 1:30 pm for all visitors to the Museum. This tour generally lasts about 60 minutes. A guided tour is also available for groups of 10 or more who make reservations prior to visiting the Museum.

See Map Graphic
The Booth Western Art Museum
501 Museum Drive
Cartersville, GA 30120
770-387-1300

If you’re looking for other Western art museums…in addition to The Booth Museum, there are 10 or 12 major Western art museums in the U.S. such as the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Center (formerly the Cowboy Hall of Fame) in Oklahoma City; The Gilcrease in Tulsa; the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming; the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, and several others. The only two in the East are the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis and the Rockwell Museum of Western Art in Corning, New York.

  • Cartersville GA | Etowah Indian Mounds Part 2
  • Cartersville GA | Tellus Science Museum Part 3  [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | Cauble Park Part 4 [coming soon]
  • Kennesaw, GA | KSU Museum of History and Holocaust Education Part 5 [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | Pickett’s Mill Battlefield and Homestead Part 6 [coming soon]
  • Acworth, GA | RV Campsite – Red Top Mountain [coming soon]
  • See other trips you can take like this one. Search by State

area-things-to-do-cartersville Click Map to Enlarge


Was this information helpful to you? If so, please click the links below to share on Facebook or pin to Pinterest so that others may enjoy this experience as well. Thanks for spreading the word!

5 Kids and a RV recommendations are based on personal experience and do not represent the business or not-for-profit we feature. We share our experiences in an effort to inspire parents and caregivers to engage and explore with their children.

5 Kids and a RV: “Let’s go learn something today.”
Copyright 2015

Save the date! Georgia’s Largest RV and Camping Show :: January 23-25, 2015

Save the date! The 2015 Atlanta Camping and RV Show will be January 23-24-25 at the Atlanta Exposition Center South (3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta GA 30354. Hours: Friday, 11-7; Saturday 9-7; Sunday 10-5. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for adults 55 and older, $5 for ages 6-16, and free for children under the age of 6. It is important to note that they accept CASH only — there is an ATM machine on site if needed. You can save a dollar or two here by printing out a coupon in advance and bringing with you to the 2015 Atlanta Camping and RV Show. This event showcases products like motor homes, fifth wheels, trailers, wheel chairs, power scooters and more etc. in the Marine & Boat industry.

The largest RV Show in Georgia