Don’t miss this “Field Trip” to the Great American Eclipse

The last time I saw a solar eclipse I was barely in grade school. I remember my mom (who was a teacher) taking me out to the open field along with her 30 students where they all held up various box filters they had created in order to look at the eclipse for she was quite adamant that to look straight at the eclipse, I could burn my retinas. (Even a 99.9% solar eclipse of the sun can damage the naked eye. Looking directly at the sun without protection for more than a few seconds can cause blindness.) I remember feeling a little bit of trepidation and I was too afraid to look except for a brief moment (as I valued my eye sight.)

Well, approximately 40 years later, I have the opportunity to experience this event again and am determined to see the solar eclipse, safely, and in totality. (They didn’t have these CE and ISO Certified Solar Eclipse Glasses when I was a little girl, but while I’m thinking about it, you can be prepared and grab some shades here.)

On Monday August 21, 2017, millions of people in the United States will experience a unique event: a total eclipse of the sun. This is to be the first coast-to-coast “total” solar eclipse in 99 years across the United States and will last 2.5 minutes across a 60-mile wide mind-blowing total eclipse blackout from Oregon’s West Coast to South Carolina’s East Coast. (See map illustration below.)

IMG_4925

According to “About 12 million people are lucky enough to live in the path of totality, and about 200 million are within a day’s drive of the path.”

Fred Espanak of MrEclipse.com has calculated that the longest solar eclipse across North America will be in Kentucky and the lower tip of Illinois (see image).

Screen Shot 2017-05-01 at 9.46.42 AM
Courtesy Fred Espanak, MrEclipse.com
eclipse-times-nasa
This NASA chart lists eclipse times for cities in the path of totality for the 2017 total solar eclipse on Aug. 21. Credit: NASA

Because the shadow of the moon will move from west to east, totality will occur later in the day the farther east you travel. Use the NASA interactive eclipse map to find out exactly when totality will occur and how long it will last in the location where you plan to observe the eclipse. You can also download this map courtesy of NASA.

REMEMBER! Looking directly at the sun, even when it is partially covered by the moon, can cause serious eye damage or blindness. NEVER look at a partial solar eclipse without proper eye protection. You can learn safety tips about viewing the eclipse here and ideas on how to make your own viewer here (see page 2).

If you plan on traveling to see the total solar eclipse, be sure to make travel plans in advance. And note that NASA predicts it will be one of the worst traffic days in history. To learn more about the North American 2017 solar eclipse, visit NASA’s page here or visit ExperienceAstronomy.com.

PS: The next solar eclipse will be in 2024 — a total solar eclipse will darken the skies above Mexico and Texas, up through the Midwest and northeastern U.S.

PSS: Don’t forget to grab some glasses early! I’m getting enough for our family (and our dog). As the demand goes up, I’m sure they’ll raise prices!

 

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